Physical Activity

About the Physical Activity Training Videos

To assist front line educators in learning and practicing the physical activity segments of the lesson plans, we developed physical activity training videos (link below). These videos are free to access and can be done in the privacy of someone’s home or office.  We recommend educators use these videos to learn and practice the physical activities until they feel comfortable leading the physical activities in their classes.

There are several videos:

  • Introductory videos – two introductory videos provide an overview of physical activity, why and how physical activity are included in Eating Smart • Being Active, and tips and tricks for effectively teaching the physical activity segments in class.
  • Instructional videos – every exercise and move included in the physical activity segments has it’s own instructional video.  These videos are designed to help educators learn each exercise individually so that they can demonstrate and teach each exercise effectively and safely.
  • Lesson videos – every lesson has a training video about the Let’s be active segment in that lesson.  These videos help the educator learn how to put all of the exercises together and allow the educator to practice leading the physical activities.
  • Video Credits

Appropriate Clothing for Physical Activity

Educators don’t need to wear special workout clothes to teach classes; however, they should wear clothing that allows them to move comfortably, bend over, and lead the physical activities. This is not the time to wear high heels or flip flops; comfortable shoes are important. Flat, closed-toed, supportive shoes with backs that don’t slip off easily are best. Tennis or athletic shoes will be the safest and most comfortable shoes to wear when doing the physical activities.

Note: The Educator leading the physical activities in these videos is wearing shorts and a short sleeve t-shirt.  The decision to have her wear this outfit for the filming of the videos was deliberate.  We wanted viewers to be able to see the angles and movements of her arms and legs to help viewers better learn the physical activities. While we felt this would be helpful while training educators to teach the physical activities, we are not endorsing this as appropriate attire for teaching classes.